What is a VPN for?

IsoMen on Honeycomb mesh

VPNs, or Virtual Private Networks, are a group of computers or remote networks linked together over the Internet. They are useful for bypassing web filters, connecting to remote servers, and browsing and downloading anonymously.

When you connect to a VPN, you log in with your credentials and all of the data you send and receive is encrypted and secure.

Who uses VPNs?

We’ve compiled a list of the people who commonly use VPN’s, along with the specific benefits they experience from it. Chances are, you fall at least partially into one of the categories below.

Students and Workers

Using an unsecured network, like at a coffee shop, can be a risk. Other people are able to access your activity, and may be tempted to steal your account info, business data, or research assignment, and your job or grades could be at stake.

Often, the VPN is provided by the school or company so that you have easy access and connection, even while traveling, to resources that you may not be able to access on another network. If you are using your own VPN, you’ll be able to bypass filters and censorship set by schools and workplaces, and browse anonymously on campus or at work. Even in public places, you can rest assured that your important work is protected from prying eyes and your user data is safe.

Downloaders

Whether you’re downloading legally or illegally, you don’t want to end up on a company’s watch list because you used certain apps on your computer. Even worse, you could end up in court or paying a hefty fine. Other technologies and services offer a false sense of security but do not actually provide the necessary protection. VPNs encrypt your IP address and are virtually untraceable, and are the only safe way to securely download.

Security Enthusiasts

No matter your profession or Internet needs, you deserve the privacy and security that a VPN can provide. Using a VPN, you can:

  • Search anonymously without the threat of your activity being traced or tracked
  • Keep your network safe from hacking by identity thieves, malware, and/or neighbors who don’t want to pay for their own Internet
  • Get a secured connection so that your communications remain private and encrypted, whether you’re at home or in a public space
  • Shield your personal and financial data from prying eyes

So if your neighbor keeps pilfering your Internet, possibly even downloading viruses or malware to your server, or if your teenager accidentally entered your credit card information into a suspicious site, or even if you’re just uncomfortable with the idea of anyone seeing your personal data or online activity, you should be using a VPN.

World Travelers

Because of time differences, language barriers, and government censorship, Internet use while abroad can be slow and frustrating. Rather than relying on an unfamiliar, unsecured local network, using a VPN while traveling eliminates those hurdles (as well as any security issues) and allows you to access any website at the speed you want in the language you want.

Businesses and Websites

Whether you own a small startup or are part of a large corporation, VPNs help secure private business data. From scheduling, payroll, product catalogs, employee and customer information, company projections, and more, your data is protected and secure. Companies commonly use VPNs for privacy reasons, but also for secure and convenient data sharing between offices, and for connecting remote employees to central work servers. Websites use them to prevent malware from affecting its users and to ensure a fast load time.

People everywhere are using VPNs, and the numbers are growing. With increasing censorship, cyber crime, and speed demands, VPNs save the day for students, businesses, travelers, downloaders, and regular people.

 

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